Last edited by Jutilar
Wednesday, October 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Epinikion. found in the catalog.

Epinikion.

Hamilton, Richard, Ph.D.

Epinikion.

General form in the odes of Pindar.

by Hamilton, Richard, Ph.D.

  • 259 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Mouton in The Hague .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pindar -- Technique

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesDe proprietatibus litterarum -- 91
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA4276 H3 1974
    The Physical Object
    Pagination126p.
    Number of Pages126
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18651607M

    [English version] A. Begriff. Das Adj. epiníkios steht zur näheren Bestimmung von ἀοιδή (Gesang), bei Pind. N. 4,78, das Ntr. Pl. epiníkia bei Aischyl. Ag. für einen Siegesschrei. In der Prosa bezieht sich das Wort, in Verbindung mit θύειν oder ἑστιᾶν, in der Regel auf die Opfer (sc. ἱερά) nach dem Sieg in einer Schlacht (Demosth. or. 19,) oder bei der Feier.   Pythian 8, probably the last epinikion Pindar composed, is unusual in the way it points elsewhere: of all the odes for Aiginetan victors, only this one fails to employ a myth related to the family of Aiakos. Instead, through its central narration of an Argive tale and through a complex network of pathways, the poem ties the victor's home island to a number of other landscapes.

    [German version] A. Term. The adjective epiníkios is used for the closer definition of ἀοιδή (aoidḗ; song) in Pind. Nem. 4,78, whereas in the neutr. pl. epiníkia represents a shout of victory. In prose, the term, in conjunction with θύειν (thýein) or ἑστιᾶν (hestiân), generally refers to the sacrifices (sc. ἱερά; hierá), which followed a victory in. Roma Rome: Nella Stamperia del Komarek, Octavos, 4 volumes; VG; bound in contemporary full vellum, gilt lettering to spines; some bookworm damage to spines, minimal impact to text block; large hole to middle of spine on volume 3; speckled text block; ex-library, with expected markings, including remnants of labels to tail of spines, blind stamps and ink stains to interior, pocket.

    Review a Brill Book; Making Sense of Illustrated Handwritten Archives; FAQ; Search. Close Search. Advanced Search Help Traces of the Hymn in the epinikion In: Mnemosyne. Author: Jan Maarten Bremer 1 View More View Less. 1 1Paulingstraat 4, CX Castricum, The Netherlands;, Email: [email protected] Pindar Ancient Greek Victory Odes Olympic Games Mythology Epinikion Latin Pindar was a 5 th-century BC Ancient Greek poet who is remembered for his poetic odes were written in honor of victors and champions of athletic games and contests.


Share this book
You might also like
folklore and folklife of New Jersey

folklore and folklife of New Jersey

Running a family business

Running a family business

Selected tables of atomic spectra

Selected tables of atomic spectra

Monsoon (Renegade Legion, 5604)

Monsoon (Renegade Legion, 5604)

Closure

Closure

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, 1868-1928

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, 1868-1928

Road Less Travelled

Road Less Travelled

Oxygen-consuming organics in nonpoint source runoff

Oxygen-consuming organics in nonpoint source runoff

Report of the sixth survey.

Report of the sixth survey.

The Road to God knows where

The Road to God knows where

Epinikion by Hamilton, Richard, Ph.D. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Greek lyric poet Pindar composed odes to celebrate victories at all four Panhellenic his fourteen Olympian Odes, glorifying victors at the Ancient Olympic Games, the First was positioned at the beginning of the collection by Aristophanes of Byzantium since it included praise for the games as well as of Pelops, who first competed at Elis (the polis or city-state in which the.

The epinikion or epinicion (plural epinikia or epinicia, Greek ἐπινίκιον, from epi- "on," + nikê, "victory") is a genre of occasional poetry also known in English as a victory ancient Greece, the epinikion most often took the form of a choral lyric, commissioned for and performed at the celebration of an athletic victory in the Panhellenic Games and sometimes in honor of a.

: Der Aufbau des Pindarischen Epinikion (German Edition) (): Wolfgang Schadewaldt: Books. This chapter explores how Greek tragedy evokes epinician poetry. The chapter begins with a discussion of epinician as a genre, drawing on both Pindar and Bacchylides.

In particular, it explores how epinician was regarded in fifth‐century Athens: a society whose democratic values are frequently believed to be at odds with the aristocratic and individualistic values of epinician. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

For Hieron of Syracuse Single Horse Race B. Water is best, and gold, like a blazing fire in the night, stands out supreme of all lordly wealth. But if, my heart, you wish to sing of contests, [5] look no further for any star warmer than the sun, shining by day through the lonely sky, and let us not proclaim any contest greater than.

Get the best deals on Olympic Games Antiquarian & Collectible Books when you shop the largest online selection at Pindar Ancient Greek Victory Odes Olympic Games Mythology Epinikion Greece.

The Olympic Spirit Years of the Games Collectible Hardcover Book Sealed. $ Got one to sell. Get it in front of + million. The praise of Olympic victors gave rise to a new form of art known as epinikion, which literally means ‘on victory’. Epinikion art in ancient Greece took the form of poems, or ‘victory odes’, such as the one above, as well as marble or bronze sculpture.

First let us look at the epinikion poetry. There were several poets who composed in the epinikion genre, but the most famous were.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Der Aufbau des Pindarischen Epinikion by Wolfgang Schadewaldt (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at.

For bookings made on or after April 6,be sure to consider the risk of the coronavirus (COVID) and associated government measures. If you don’t book a flexible rate, you may not be entitled to a refund.

Your cancellation request will be handled by the property, based on your chosen policy and consumer law where applicable/10(96). Page - Άρχεται | άττ' την άσπρη θάλασσαν \ θάλασσαν έπέρασε \ καΐ σπείρ' οικονόμησε, \ κάβησε και λάλησε, \ πέτραν κατα\ύσαι.

| μάρτη μ', μάρτη μου καλέ \ και φλεβάρη φοβερέ, \ καν χιονίσης, καν πόντισης, \ πάλιν άνοιξιν. Page - NOW winter nights enlarge The number of their hours ; And clouds their storms discharge Upon the airy towers. Let now the chimneys blaze And cups o'erflow with wine, Let well-tuned words amaze With harmony divine.

Now yellow waxen lights Shall wait on honey love While youthful revels, masques, and Courtly sights, Sleep's leaden spells remove. Pindar Ancient Greek Victory Odes Olympic Games Mythology Epinikion Greece.

Pindar was a 5 th-century BC Ancient Greek poet who is remembered for his poetic odes were written in honor of victors and champions of athletic games and contests. Swift discusses choruses from five ritual genres: paian (religious songs of celebration or healing), epinikion (songs for athletic victors), partheneia (songs for the transitions of young girls), hymenaios (wedding song), and thr nos (funerary song), and explores how these choral forms are evoked in : Hardcover.

Hamilton, Epinikion: General Form in the Odes of Pindar (The Hague ). Köhnken, Die Funktion des Mythos bei Pindar (Berlin ). Kurke, The Traffic in Praise: Pindar and the Poetics of Social Economy (Ithaca ). Race, Pindar (Boston ); Style and.

Author(s): Kurke, Leslie | Abstract: Pindar’s epinikian odes were poems commissioned to celebrate athletic victories in the first half of the fifth century BCE.

Drawing on the insights of interpretive anthropology and cultural history, Leslie Kurke investigates how the socially embedded genre of epinikion responded to a period of tremendous social and cultural by: References [].

epinikion in Harry Thurston Peck, editor () Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers.

Since the central findings of this book—Pindar is an oral poet; the epinician text records a speech (not text) event; epinikion is a centrifugal, stylistically diverse form of traditional art—hinge upon a rigorous, ethnographic description of Pindar’s language, this Introduction addresses questions of philological methodology—where we.

The epinikion is a genre of occasional poetry also known in English as a victory ode. In ancient Greece, the epinikion most often took the form of a choral lyric, commissioned for and performed at the celebration of an athletic victory in the Panhellenic Games and sometimes in honor of a victory in war.

Of, related to, or resembling a certain type of Greek ode in honor of a victorious athleteA Greek ode in honor of a victorious athleteW.B. Henry, “Preface”, in Pindar's Nemeans, page v: it is some time since a commentator writing in English tackled a whole book of the epinicians.

Richard Hamilton is an American philologist and educator. He is a scholar of ancient Greek literature at Bryn Mawr College with specialties in Greek literature, religion, and iconography.His topics include philology as perspective on the interaction of language and social life, text and sign, epinikion as event, ways of epinician speaking, and novelistic features of epinician style.

The Center for Hellenic Studies in an imprint of Harvard University Press. ([c] Book News, Inc., Portland, OR).The bulk of the book consists of detailed discussions of five lyric genres, with chapters on paian, epinikion, partheneia, hymenaios, and Thrēnos.

Each chapter includes a discussion of the genre in question, an overview of its use in tragedy, and detailed case‐studies of two or three plays where the lyric references are particularly rich and.